FAN FICTION Best Scene Reading of THE LAST CAMPOUT, by Mike Meade

Genre: Drama, Thriller, Horror

Five friends on a campout in the Pacific NW are stalked by an unknown killer.

CAST LIST:

Narrator: Sean Ballantyne
Chelsea: Val Cole
Anthony: John Fray

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Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Director: Kierston Drier

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: Kimberly Villarruel

Camera Op: Mary Cox

FAN FICTION Short: FALLEN: A STAR WARS STORY, by by George Deihl Jr.

 

Genre: Adventure, Sci-Fi

After the events of the Phantom Menace and the start of the Clone Wars – a valuable lesson of integrity, love and the Force.

CAST LIST:

Qui Gane: Rachel Rain Packota
Narrator: Olivia Jon
Bixel: <a href="Allan Cooke
Jac Pale: Geoff Mays

Get to know the writer:

 1. What is your screenplay about?

Fallen – a Star Wars story is about Bixel, an exJedi who’s left the order to start a family on a distant planet. An unexpected visitor arrives and disrupts the peaceful life he’s struggled to create.

At it’s heart it’s about understanding that character and integrity, not uniforms and dogma are what make a hero.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Fantasy and Science Fiction, and of course Star Wars, which should be a genre in and of itself.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

I believe it would start a dialogue about patience, caring and the people we call heroes in our society.

I think Star Wars has always been very progressive in its themes. Even the prequels were filled with subversive plot lines and thought provoking ideas – it was the story of a corrupt government working with a corporation to create an endless profitable war. The original trilogy was about fighting against the establishment. And just recently THE LAST JEDI’s true villain was toxic masculinity.

FALLEN continues with these themes. It is allegory of the over-reach of the Police, which is unfortunately happening around the world and in our country. Jac Pale believes himself faultless and is emboldened by his status a Jedi. Like a police officer who believes his uniform should illicit veneration, he is incapable of seeing the situation with Bixel and his daughter correctly. He then attacks and punishes instead of guiding, protecting and giving aid.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Exciting and heartbreaking.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

ehhhh – it’s probably STAR WARS. But I promise I am into way more than that.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

The story and themes were with me for sometime. I wrote and edited it in about two weeks.

7. How many stories have you written?

I’ve written a feature film, THE JOURNAL OF 2ND LT. ISAAC BANGS. It’s a action / horror movie that takes place in Manhattan during the American Revolution. I’m working on a few shorts. THE ALGORITHM takes a science fiction bent on the dangers of following religious dogma blindly. The others, ISSUES vol 1 and ISSUES vol 2 – are about a psychiatrist whose clients are superheroes. Vol. 1, like FALLEN, is about how integrity of character makes a hero – not fancy costumes and powers. Vol. 2 is a sweet love story of two superheroes struggling with social issues and the hazards of secret identities. ISSUES has a great deal of comic book art that I have drawn myself, under the nom de plume – BIXEL BOONE.

I have also got another Star Wars short, about smugglers figuring out the political climate of the galaxy after the first DEATH STAR has been destroyed.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

Currently – YOUR LOVE by THE OUTFIELD. Music is always a big part of my artistic endeavors. YOUR LOVE is having an influence on ISSUES vol 2. It was DUEL OF THE FATES from THE PHANTOM MENACE soundtrack for FALLEN.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

“Showing not telling” – writing behavior. It is something that, being a new writer, I’m currently struggling. I’ve a treasure trove of ideas and I’m just learning to turn them into screenplays.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I am also an actor and an artist. I have been an actor in NYC for many years. Some years ago I was diagnosed with leukemia, which set me back a few years in my career. Fortunately, I am 100% back and have beaten it soundly. After returning to show-business, I realized I wanted to explore new ways to tell the stories running around in my head.

I am also a senior dog adoption advocate. And My wife and I have a 12 year old poodle named Vanilla Bean.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

Great – I love it. I’ve got all the deadlines stashed away so I can submit all the screenplays I am working on for next year’s festivals.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I wanted to find a way to do something more with these Star Wars Shorts than just show my friends. So…honestly – I googled “fan fiction screenplay festivals”.

The initial feedback was amazing! it was so helpful and much more detailed than I expected. It taught me things about myself a writer that I don’t think I could have discovered elsewhere.

******

Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Director: Matthew Toffolo

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: Kimberly Villarruel

Camera Op: Mary Cox

Winning FAN FICTION SHORT – LIVING IN CRIME ALLEY (BATMAN), by Rob Ayling

Genre: Action, Drama, Crime, Thriller

A single father struggles to live and provide for his young son in downtown Gotham City.

CAST LIST:

Narrator: Carina Cojeen
Father: Nick Baillie

Get to know the writer:

What is your screenplay about?

Living in Crime Alley is about a single father in downtown Gotham City struggling to live and provide for his young son. The son is a huge fan of Batman. Living in Crime Alley raises questions of morality and justice from the points of view of a father, the child and the dark knight himself.

What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Drama/Crime.

Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

This screenplay should be made into movie because it brings the dark knight and
everything that he brings with him into the sharp focus of todays recession and the reality of everyday struggle. The perspective of a ground level citizen living in Gotham City is something that hasn’t been fully explored in film. Despite Batman having been created in the late 1930s, Living in Crime Alley shows that his character has a resonance with the life that people live today.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Conflicted, Justice.

What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Billy Wilder’s The Apartment. Its simply one of the best movies ever made. Great
writing, great direction and masterclass acting from Jack Lemmon. A funny, dramatic,timeless movie that I’ve re-watched many times for inspiration and entertainment. But Hitchcock’s Rear Window runs at a close second.

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I’ve been working on Living in Crime Alley for the the last 6 months. I started writing the screenplay after having gone through one the worst financial periods in my life. Instead of sitting around helplessly, I wrote Living in Crime Alley not only as a way to escape my own problems, but also to express my frustrations in a creative way.

How many stories have you written?

I have written several original short stories for films, but this is my first fan fiction short screenplay. I’m a huge fan of the Batman character and I’ve always wanted to write or direct a Batman story.

What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

One of my favourite songs and one I listen to all the time is Sinnerman by Nina Simone. Or any Nina Simone songs in truth.

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

The biggest obstacle I had to finishing the screenplay was the ending. As a writer, I think its important to raise questions within your work. The final moments of Living in Crime Alley is very much a question on justice and morality. From another perspective, the ending could’ve gone for a more sympathetic route or perhaps an even more darker turn. I leave it to the audience to make their own judgement.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Besides from writing, I’m passionate about making films. I have directed several short films, some of which have had screenings at BAFTA recognised film festivals. I also love to draw, read, travel and eat good food.

You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

This is the first time I’ve entered a screenplay on FilmFreeway. In my experience, it’s by far, the easiest way to submit your work to festivals.

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I submitted Living in Crime Alley to Fan Fiction Festival to gain constructive feedback on my work and progress as a writer. I never expected the screenplay to be a winner and for that I am very grateful. The feedback was extremely valuable in helping me hone my craft. They pointed out particular screenplay formatting issues I had made, in terms of introducing characters, dialogue etc. As well as making creative suggestions on how to improve the story. I’ve never really been a confident writer, but the feedback they gave me on my screenplay was a validation on my skills.

****

Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Director: Kierston Drier
Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne
Editor: John Johnson

Camera Operator: Mary Cox

Winning Fan Fiction Screenplay – ROCKETEERS, by Gil Saint

Watch the August 2017 Winning FAN FICTION Screenplay.

Genre: Action, Adventure, Fantasy, Family.

Based on the 1991 movie “The Rocketeer”. The grandson of a high-flying hero will do anything to live up to his grandfather’s legacy, including battling a new global threat. The odds may be against him, but he’s got a secret weapon: a prototype jetpack that’s destined to make him a legend.

CAST LIST:

Narrator: Hugh Ritchie
Charlie: Nick Wicht
Lex: Julia Baldwin
Valentina: Alicia Payne
Tour Guide: Beck Lloyd
Bodyguard: David Occhipinti
Air Traffic Guy: Michael Lake

Get to know the writer:

What is your screenplay about?

In the spirit of something like TRON: Legacy or Jurassic World, ROCKETEERS is a modern day “legacy-quel” that pays tribute to its source material, but takes the mythos in an exciting new direction. It’s a passing-of-the-torch from the jazzy 30’s world depicted in the original 1991 Rocketeer movie… to what the golden age hero might look like in today’s high-tech universe. My story follows Charlie Secord, a thief with a good heart who will do anything to protect his grandfather’s heroic legacy — that of Cliff Secord, the original Rocketeer. Yes, the jetpack doesn’t fall far from the tree, as we see Charlie forced into taking up the mantle of becoming the Rocketeer when a frightening new global threat emerges with designs on ruling the skies. Charlie may be in over his head, but he won’t have to battle evil alone… hence the title, ROCKETEERS. The ‘s’ -the pluralization of that word- is meaningful in more ways than one.

What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Hopefully, like its blockbuster predecessor, it’s a Family Action/Adventure.

Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

Of all of Disney’s live action fare from the 80’s and 90’s, I firmly believe The Rocketeer is the most deserving of a sequel. Aside from the fact that I believe he’d feel right at home in the superhero movie landscape –especially with the homegrown, All-American Steve Rogers defending the multiplex for the MCU; a square-jawed Cliff Secord type– I think the universe of The Rocketeer is ripe for re-discovery and exploration. The original movie is a classic, no doubt, but it’s really a comedic look at the classic hero’s origin story. We’ve seen him learn to fly and juggle his secret identity with his masked one, with kind of a wink and a smile. But we’ve also seen that now in countless other superhero movies. What excites me is the possibility of seeing this “aw shucks” hero through the lens of a modern day action film; seeing him go up against other high-flying villains that are, perhaps, villains better suited for a Liam Neeson actioner, and not a family film. How does that affect the tone of The Rocketeer when, yes, we believe he could be in real mortal danger? And yes, we’ve seen him in the golden age of zeppelins and biplanes. Now let’s see him survive high-stakes threats in an age of drones and stealth military tech wonders and power-mad dictators. And, what they could achieve with the modest optical FX of the 90s was great, but how cool would it be to see The Rocketeer in an ILM-style action sequence with updated VFX?? I get a big, goofy grin on my face just thinking about how cool it would all look. Look out, Iron Man! This Rocketeer would straight up OWN aerial action sequences.

How would you describe this script in two words?

As you can probably tell, brevity is not my strong suit. Two words…. aw jeez… how about: ROCKETEER. INSANITY.

What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

I’m an action and sci-fi nut, but funny enough, the movie I’ve probably watched the most is ED WOOD. I love watching movies about making movies, and I also am something of a Tim Burton apologist. I used to be a Tim Burton defender, now I’m an apologist. It’s not easy these days for us Burton fans. Well, before Alice and all that, he made what might be the best movie about making a movie ever made… ED WOOD. It’s Depp in his prime before he started annoying people. It’s touching, uplifting, humanizing… and it’s honestly the funniest movie I’ve ever seen. I’d put it above Spinal Tap for best comedy movie, no joke. The late, great Martin Landau powers the movie with an all-timer performance as Bela Lugosi. That accent. Every line out of his mouth is a quotable gem. And when I’m feeling down, or creatively empty, the movie inspires me. It reminds me of everything I love about movies and the creative process in general. It teaches me to rise above the odds, to shake off the hate and second thoughts. It makes me want to create. Plus, it’s got gorgeous black-and-white cinematography and an awesomely gothy score. Runner-up is PUMPKINHEAD.

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I’ve honestly been toying with this story for 26 years. Ever since I saw the first Rocketeer in the theaters back in ’91, I was imagining a sequel. I kept holding out hope that Disney would make one, but they never did. I scribbled little notes here and there, I’d put it down, I’d pick it up, and back down again. It was only recently, in the last year, that I sat down and made myself streamline the ideas and turn it into a screenplay. Once I got writing, I cranked it out over a couple of weekends; full days of writing – mornings for new stuff, afternoons for rewrites.

How many stories have you written?

Several. I don’t have an exact number thanks to all the false starts, but it’s I’m sure it’s up there. I have stories I keep going back to, and I have inklings of ideas for things all the time. Let’s guesstimate that it’s between five real stories and about a zillion fragments of others.

What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

Man, this is tough. It’s not my favorite, but you know what song I listen to A LOT? “Epic” by Faith No More. When those drums kick in, it gets me so pumped up, I feel like steam shoots out of my ears like a real life Looney Tune, and I bounce around the city all day after I hear it. I feel like I could run through a wall, or take on the world, or at least mosh a bit and not be self-conscious about it.

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

I’m my own worst enemy. My biggest obstacle is my stupid mind. My first instinct is to second guess everything I put on the page. “Is it good enough?” “Will people think this is cool?” “Does this make sense?” I have to fight those demons back every page, and remind myself that I’m writing for me. No one else. Yes, it’s good to know your audience and all that, but you have to please yourself first and foremost. If you yourself like it, chances are others like you will enjoy it too. Once I get over that little voice, the scenes geyser out. Movie magic happens.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Animals – especially, my cat. I’ll keep his identity a secret, but his nickname is Boo Man. He’s freakin’ adorable. I also am an avid movie watcher. I am passionate about seeing film and discussing it; I average 1 to 2 trips to the theater a week. I like to see everything on THE BIGGEST SCREEN POSSIBLE. Big releases, indies, classics. Specialty screenings are my favorite. I recently saw a 35mm print of the original Robocop on the big screen and it was a transcendent experience. The audience was cheering and hollering at every classic scene, it was like an interactive Robocop rock concert. “Dead or alive, you’re coming with me!” APPLAUSE. “Your move, creep!” DOUBLE APPLAUSE. I also pretend I’m interested in cooking, but I think I’m more interested in eating.

You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

So far, so good. They’ve made submitting easy, and I’m extremely grateful for that.

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

Fan Fiction Festival seemed liked the premier fest for fan-driven stories, so it felt like an organic choice. I wanted the script to find an audience of like-minded creators and fans that not only celebrate the properties they love, but create within those worlds as well. I’m happy your fest exists, honestly; it seems like fan fiction stuff is hard to get out there, so thank you for doing the good work. In terms of feedback, I’m always gobsmacked anytime anyone likes anything I do, so I was flattered by my reader’s kind remarks and warm reaction to the script. I also thought he was gentleman, and phrased his constructive criticism in a very polite manner. If you’re reading this now, Mystery Reader Man, thank you for that.

****

Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Director: Kierston Drier
Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne
Editor: John Johnson

Camera Operator: Mary Cox

Winning June 2017 FAN FICTION Screenplay – DOCTOR WHO “The Kingdom of the Mara” by Paul Hewitt

Genre: Fantasy, Adventure

The Doctor accidentally picks up Shona and the two investigate a red comet that lands on Earth. The Doctor discovers the Mara are back, and must use their technology against them to defeat them once more.

CAST LIST:

Narrator: Elizabeth Rose Morriss
The Doctor: Brian Carleton
Shona: Konstantina Mantelos
Solomon: Anthony Botelho
Vladislav: Jack Comerford
Mila: Andrea Meister
Enok: Jordy Kieto

Get to know the writer:

What is your TV spec screenplay about DOCTOR WHO about?

The Doctor and Shona (last seen in the episode “Last Christmas”), find themselves in Bohemia during the Dark Ages. A tyrant, Lord Ivan, hoards a peculiar red crystal with telepathic powers called the Crimson. Wearing jewels made of Crimson, Lord Ivan and his followers collectively conjure a serpentine gestalt being from the darkest recesses of their minds: The Mara.

Possessed by The Mara, Lord Ivan quickly conquers all before him. He besieges the largest castle (and only cathedral) in the rival kingdom of Vladislav. The Doctor knows that walls, warriors and weapons are no match for the insidious, seductive spell of The Mara.

The Doctor and Shona rouse King Vladislav and his people to fight The Mara through very unconventional means – particularly for The Doctor. The world’s future truly rests on a hope and a prayer.

Why does this screenplay fit into the context of the show?

It’s a traditional good versus evil story with the odd bits of comedy and horror that you’d expect from Dr. Who. I wrote it for the 12th Doctor, Peter Capaldi – who I think is fabulous – a throwback to the 70’s Doctors, Jon Pertwee and Tom Baker.

This story is very much in the mold of classic Doctor Who. You have a historic setting that is disrupted by the presence of a perfidious alien – oh, and then there’s The Mara and a mysterious red crystal. Seriously though, The Mara was one of my favourite Who monsters from the 80’s and I am surprised it has not reappeared on TV (yet). The companion Tegan’s experience with the “evil dream snake” is what made her my favourite during the Peter Davison years.

We all know The Doctor’s companion is a surrogate for the audience and a great companion makes for a great Who story. I chose a character from a recent Christmas special – Shona McCullough (played wonderfully by actor Faye Marsay)– because I immediately saw in her the potential for a long term TARDIS traveller.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Faith Wins

What TV show do you keep watching over and over again?

Doctor Who
(also Game of Thrones, Mad Men…)

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

Six months (Off and On). So maybe 6 weeks’ worth of an actual research and writing (and rewriting).

How many stories have you written?

Two Features (Housesitting, Guttersnipe)
One Documentary (All About Me)
One Short (co-wrote) (Saved From The Grave)

Next up is my own TV series and this TV spec script was an excellent exercise in writing for this genre.

What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

In My Life (The Beatles)

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Time was my biggest obstacle… finding the time.

The second challenge was how to portray The Mara. It is obviously not my own creation, so I wanted to do justice to the original Mara stories with my version.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Acting, films, politics, history, rugby and beer (not necessarily in that order)

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I had my first feature screenplay analyzed not once, but twice. I was impressed by the depth and value of the criticism. So I did not hesitate to submit my Doctor Who script for analysis and I am pleasantly surprised in the end to have it recognized here. Thank you.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

It’s an old cliché but true: Write what you know. That’s why I picked Doctor Who for my first TV screenplay.

Be prepared to take a lot of criticism along the way. Your story (and your skills) will benefit from it.

Procrastination is thine worst enemy.

*****

Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Camera Operator: Kierston Drier

Editor: John Johnson

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

FAN FICTION Screenplay – UNIVERSAL SAINT BATMAN by Nathan Trumbull

Watch the January 2017 FAN FICTION Screenplay Winner.

Best Scene from the screenplay UNIVERSAL SAINT BATMAN Screenplay
Written by Nathan Trumbull

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Catherine D’Angelo
SUMMER – Val Cole
BIRDIE – Shannon McNally
KYLE – Gabriel Darku
BRUCE WAYNE – David Straus
VIC STONE – Charles Gordon
JOKER – Nick Wicht

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Adventure, Action, Sci-Fi, Mystery

Decades after the disbanding of the Justice League, Gotham citizen, Birdie Vale’s public and private fight with a cutting-edge robotic policing initiative leads her on a collision course with not only her clouded past, but the Dark Knight himself.


What is your screenplay about?

Universal Saint Batman is about a future where Gotham has begun questioning Batman’s relevance after the dawn of hyper intelligent AI systems and androids. Birdie Vale, a new character to the Batman Universe, seeks to find out from the Bat himself what he thinks about the new robots as well as explore her own personal relationship to him.

What genres does your screenplay under?

In typical Batman fashion, I’d consider this a neo-noir sci-fi mystery.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Fun and fresh

Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

I think this would make a great film because it doesn’t follow Batman or Bruce Wayne, but rather a whole new character for people to rediscover the Batman universe with. It offers a fresh story with a cast of characters you may be familiar with, but shown in an entirely new light.

What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

I’d bet Jaws

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I’d had the idea for the script for quite awhile before sitting down to write a draft, of which I wrote three in about two months time before it came to how it exists now.

What motivated you to write this screenplay?

I’d always wanted to give fan fiction a try and contests like this one seemed as good a reason as any.

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Finding people to generate good feedback on fan fiction is difficult when no one in your creative circle has done it before so I’d say that was the hardest challenge… That or deciding to gender swap the main character after the first draft.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I enjoy bouldering, movies, and video games when I have the time.

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

The festival was great motivation to get the script done and the feedback was indispensable in regards to bettering myself as a writer.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Don’t dwell on the advice of other writers. Do what lets you write and write as much as you can.

****
Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com
Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne
Editor: John Johnson

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September 2016 Fan Fiction Screenplay Winner

Watch the September 2016 Fan Fiction Screenplay Winner. 

Submit your Fan Fiction Screenplay to the Festival: https://fanfictionfestival.com/

Fan Fiction: VIGILANTE: The Origins of Casey Jones (TMNT) by Justin Prince

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Action, Crime, Thriller

After an injury put a halt to his plans of playing hockey in the NHL, Casey Jones doesn’t believe life can get much worse. He soon finds out just how wrong he is. Faced with a tragedy Jones takes justice into his own hands, becoming a hockey mask wearing vigilante. (Based on the character from Eastman and Laird’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles).

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Steve Rizzo
CASEY – Randy Baumer
BOSS – Dan Cristofori
HUN – Steve Mitchell
CRISTO – John Fray
VAN – Kaleb Alexander
APRIL – Norma Dawn Dunphy

Get to know the writer:

What is your screenplay about?

My screenplay works as a retelling of the origin story of Casey Jones, the hockey masked vigilante of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle’s fame. The story reveals who Casey is as a person and what events push him to take on his crime-fighting persona.

What genres does your screenplay fall under?

I would describe it as a graphic action/superhero film.

Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

Casey Jones is one of the most popular characters from the TMNT universe outside of the four turtles themselves. This script really just gives you an idea of who Casey Jones is, the hardships that shaped him and how he develops into the vigilante that goes on to become one of the turtle’s most trusted allies.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Gritty & fun.

What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

I’m not sure; there are a lot of movies I revisit, including the original 1990s live action TMNT film. But, the film I’ve probably watched the most in my life is probably “Raging Bull.”

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I have been a TMNT fan my entire life but as I got older I began to identify more with Casey Jones than I did the turtles themselves. So I’ve been conceptualizing the script for a long time I’d say. But, it wasn’t until after the most recent TMNT film was released that I began to really sit down and outline the story. The TMNT of the comics are actually really dark and gritty with Casey Jones being one of its darkest and most gritty characters. I really wanted my script to reflect the comic universe more so than any of the film incarnations of the TMNT have.

How many stories have you written?

Oh, I could never put a number on it. I’ve been writing stories since I was a little kid. I’ve always enjoyed storytelling and have told stories in almost every format you can tell one in. As far as scripts go this is my fifth short script. I’m also currently working on the screenplay a feature length film.

What motivated you to write this screenplay?

I just really wanted to tell a story within the TMNT universe but tell it in a way that reflected the comics more so than the cartoons. The original TMNT comics are really quite a contrast from the other forms of TMNT media; they also started as a parody of the superhero genre. I wanted to bring the grittiness of the comics to life in a script and I also wanted to have that element of parody. So here that element comes with Casey’s obsession with action films and his penchant for quoting them in battle.

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

The biggest obstacle was writing the action sequences. I haven’t ever really written any significant action sequences for a screenplay before and this one has several of them. So figuring out how to write them in a way that conveyed what I envisioned along with the pacing I had in mind was really something I had to experiment with to figure out.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I’m really passionate about all aspects of film. Lately, I’ve really began to delve into editing and learning the way that editors tell a story or alter how a story is told.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

My biggest tip is embracing the rewriting process. So many people like to write, but they don’t like to rewrite. You have to learn to love rewriting, especially if you’re going to choose to write screenplays.

***
Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: John Johnson