FAN FICTION Short: FALLEN: A STAR WARS STORY, by by George Deihl Jr.

 

Genre: Adventure, Sci-Fi

After the events of the Phantom Menace and the start of the Clone Wars – a valuable lesson of integrity, love and the Force.

CAST LIST:

Qui Gane: Rachel Rain Packota
Narrator: Olivia Jon
Bixel: <a href="Allan Cooke
Jac Pale: Geoff Mays

Get to know the writer:

 1. What is your screenplay about?

Fallen – a Star Wars story is about Bixel, an exJedi who’s left the order to start a family on a distant planet. An unexpected visitor arrives and disrupts the peaceful life he’s struggled to create.

At it’s heart it’s about understanding that character and integrity, not uniforms and dogma are what make a hero.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Fantasy and Science Fiction, and of course Star Wars, which should be a genre in and of itself.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

I believe it would start a dialogue about patience, caring and the people we call heroes in our society.

I think Star Wars has always been very progressive in its themes. Even the prequels were filled with subversive plot lines and thought provoking ideas – it was the story of a corrupt government working with a corporation to create an endless profitable war. The original trilogy was about fighting against the establishment. And just recently THE LAST JEDI’s true villain was toxic masculinity.

FALLEN continues with these themes. It is allegory of the over-reach of the Police, which is unfortunately happening around the world and in our country. Jac Pale believes himself faultless and is emboldened by his status a Jedi. Like a police officer who believes his uniform should illicit veneration, he is incapable of seeing the situation with Bixel and his daughter correctly. He then attacks and punishes instead of guiding, protecting and giving aid.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Exciting and heartbreaking.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

ehhhh – it’s probably STAR WARS. But I promise I am into way more than that.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

The story and themes were with me for sometime. I wrote and edited it in about two weeks.

7. How many stories have you written?

I’ve written a feature film, THE JOURNAL OF 2ND LT. ISAAC BANGS. It’s a action / horror movie that takes place in Manhattan during the American Revolution. I’m working on a few shorts. THE ALGORITHM takes a science fiction bent on the dangers of following religious dogma blindly. The others, ISSUES vol 1 and ISSUES vol 2 – are about a psychiatrist whose clients are superheroes. Vol. 1, like FALLEN, is about how integrity of character makes a hero – not fancy costumes and powers. Vol. 2 is a sweet love story of two superheroes struggling with social issues and the hazards of secret identities. ISSUES has a great deal of comic book art that I have drawn myself, under the nom de plume – BIXEL BOONE.

I have also got another Star Wars short, about smugglers figuring out the political climate of the galaxy after the first DEATH STAR has been destroyed.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

Currently – YOUR LOVE by THE OUTFIELD. Music is always a big part of my artistic endeavors. YOUR LOVE is having an influence on ISSUES vol 2. It was DUEL OF THE FATES from THE PHANTOM MENACE soundtrack for FALLEN.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

“Showing not telling” – writing behavior. It is something that, being a new writer, I’m currently struggling. I’ve a treasure trove of ideas and I’m just learning to turn them into screenplays.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I am also an actor and an artist. I have been an actor in NYC for many years. Some years ago I was diagnosed with leukemia, which set me back a few years in my career. Fortunately, I am 100% back and have beaten it soundly. After returning to show-business, I realized I wanted to explore new ways to tell the stories running around in my head.

I am also a senior dog adoption advocate. And My wife and I have a 12 year old poodle named Vanilla Bean.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

Great – I love it. I’ve got all the deadlines stashed away so I can submit all the screenplays I am working on for next year’s festivals.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I wanted to find a way to do something more with these Star Wars Shorts than just show my friends. So…honestly – I googled “fan fiction screenplay festivals”.

The initial feedback was amazing! it was so helpful and much more detailed than I expected. It taught me things about myself a writer that I don’t think I could have discovered elsewhere.

******

Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Director: Matthew Toffolo

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: Kimberly Villarruel

Camera Op: Mary Cox

August 2016 Fan Fiction Screenplay Winner

Watch the August 2016 Fan Fiction Screenplay Winner. 

Submit your Fan Fiction Screenplay to the Festival: https://fanfictionfestival.com/

THE MASK OF LEIA
by Ian Wilson

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi

Following the Battle of Endor and the defeat of the Empire, Leia secretly struggles with her own ongoing internal battle with the Force.

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Becky Shrimpton
LEIA – Laura Darby
EMPEROR – Stephen Flett
HAN SOLO – David Straus
ACKBAR – Rais Muoi

Get to know the winner writer: 

1. What is your fan fiction screenplay about?

The Mask of Leia is a thought-provoking drama that explores the hidden psyche of Princess Leia. It aims to prompt the viewer into thinking about the trauma that Leia has undergone through the Star Wars story and what her internal struggles from dealing with all that suffering might be.

By all rights, Leia should be a total basket-case or at least have severe PTSD but she has managed to mask these personal struggles from everyone around her, including Han Solo. The script also explores the potential of her being Force-sensitive and keeping this hidden, perhaps for political reasons.

How does this screenplay fix into the context of the Star Wars universe?

The story takes place just after the Battle of Endor (Star Wars: Episode VI -The Return of the Jedi) and the defeat of the Empire.

Leia and Admiral Ackbar lead the Rebel forces to the planet Coruscant to secure the New Republic. It is during this journey that we see Leia secretly struggle with her trauma and her ongoing internal battle with the Force.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Hidden backstory.

What TV show do you keep watching over and over again?

I’m a Dr. Who fan. I have been since I was about five years old. I
love watching the current Doctor, Peter Capaldi, because I went to school with him and we were in the same theatre company together as teens in Glasgow, Scotland. He used to play Dr. Who in the school playground and he was a natural at it then. I was not surprised that he got the role as Doctor Who.

5. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

The story was sketched out over a couple of days between film
director, David Connellan, and myself. It then took me about three weeks to achieve the final draft.

6. How many stories have you written?

In terms of screenplays, I have written five stories – two features and three shorts. I am currently, writing my third feature, which is a thriller/horror.

7. What motivated you to write this screenplay?

I have always been a Star Wars fan from the very first time I saw that iconic Star Wars roll-up. So, when my friend and director, David Connellan, asked me to write a screenplay for a Star Wars short I jumped at the chance. Writing the roll-up to this story was fun.

8. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

The goal was to come up with a five-minute screenplay – about five pages. Trying to capture the whole of Leia’s trauma into just five minutes was very difficult. My initial draft was close to twelve pages and the final draft was around eight pages. Cutting out some great scenes and dialogue was tortuous. Sadly, cutting it down further for a five-minute film meant a lot of sacrifices in the overall story, including the iconic roll-up.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Travel. In my view, travel has been my greatest teacher. It has
allowed me to experience and understand people and cultures across so many countries. Travel has helped me realize that while we are all members of the same small planet and there are also more ways to live than just the one we have been born into.

Travel is experiential and visual and for me that helps me in my
screenwriting, which is very much about creating a visual experience.

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

The Fan Fiction Festival is a well renowned festival and platform for fan fiction and fan films. Entering the Festival was a “must-do” for me. In the Fan Fiction Festival, I love how engaged fans can be in developing their own derivatives of the original stories. It’s a form of organic creation that deserves more credit.

The feedback I received from the festival was very useful in tightening the story. I certainly appreciated this. The only advice I didn’t feel comfortable with was to develop more character for Han Solo. I felt that would have detracted from Leia’s story.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

I like to start with “what if” questions to get a story going. The concept of The Mask of Leia is a good example. What if Leia has PTSD and is being internally pulled by the dark and light side of the Force? Think about that question and you have all sorts of ideas for a story.

Write with passion and don’t be afraid to go with your gut when writing a story. If you let others get involved and question your story concept early in the process it will most likely upset your creativity and your story will turn out half-assed. Of course, listen to feedback once you’ve completed that first and subsequent drafts as feedback will help refine and improve the story.

Finally, I’d say that make sure that you develop engaging characters.

Such characters are distinct, likeable (or loathsome) and have a strong motivation. Ultimately, these characters do not ride along with the flow of the story, rather they create the direction of the story.

***
Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: John Johnson

Fan Fiction Screenplay – The Mask of Leia by Ian Wilson

Watch the August 2016 Fan Fiction Screenplay Winner.

THE MASK OF LEIA
by Ian Wilson

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi

Following the Battle of Endor and the defeat of the Empire, Leia secretly struggles with her own ongoing internal battle with the Force.

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Becky Shrimpton
LEIA – Laura Darby
EMPEROR – Stephen Flett
HAN SOLO – David Straus
ACKBAR – Rais Muoi

Get to know the winner writer: 

1. What is your fan fiction screenplay about?

The Mask of Leia is a thought-provoking drama that explores the hidden psyche of Princess Leia. It aims to prompt the viewer into thinking about the trauma that Leia has undergone through the Star Wars story and what her internal struggles from dealing with all that suffering might be.

By all rights, Leia should be a total basket-case or at least have severe PTSD but she has managed to mask these personal struggles from everyone around her, including Han Solo. The script also explores the potential of her being Force-sensitive and keeping this hidden, perhaps for political reasons.

How does this screenplay fix into the context of the Star Wars universe?

The story takes place just after the Battle of Endor (Star Wars: Episode VI -The Return of the Jedi) and the defeat of the Empire.

Leia and Admiral Ackbar lead the Rebel forces to the planet Coruscant to secure the New Republic. It is during this journey that we see Leia secretly struggle with her trauma and her ongoing internal battle with the Force.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Hidden backstory.

What TV show do you keep watching over and over again?

I’m a Dr. Who fan. I have been since I was about five years old. I
love watching the current Doctor, Peter Capaldi, because I went to school with him and we were in the same theatre company together as teens in Glasgow, Scotland. He used to play Dr. Who in the school playground and he was a natural at it then. I was not surprised that he got the role as Doctor Who.

5. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

The story was sketched out over a couple of days between film
director, David Connellan, and myself. It then took me about three weeks to achieve the final draft.

6. How many stories have you written?

In terms of screenplays, I have written five stories – two features and three shorts. I am currently, writing my third feature, which is a thriller/horror.

7. What motivated you to write this screenplay?

I have always been a Star Wars fan from the very first time I saw that iconic Star Wars roll-up. So, when my friend and director, David Connellan, asked me to write a screenplay for a Star Wars short I jumped at the chance. Writing the roll-up to this story was fun.

8. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

The goal was to come up with a five-minute screenplay – about five pages. Trying to capture the whole of Leia’s trauma into just five minutes was very difficult. My initial draft was close to twelve pages and the final draft was around eight pages. Cutting out some great scenes and dialogue was tortuous. Sadly, cutting it down further for a five-minute film meant a lot of sacrifices in the overall story, including the iconic roll-up.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Travel. In my view, travel has been my greatest teacher. It has
allowed me to experience and understand people and cultures across so many countries. Travel has helped me realize that while we are all members of the same small planet and there are also more ways to live than just the one we have been born into.

Travel is experiential and visual and for me that helps me in my
screenwriting, which is very much about creating a visual experience.

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

The Fan Fiction Festival is a well renowned festival and platform for fan fiction and fan films. Entering the Festival was a “must-do” for me. In the Fan Fiction Festival, I love how engaged fans can be in developing their own derivatives of the original stories. It’s a form of organic creation that deserves more credit.

The feedback I received from the festival was very useful in tightening the story. I certainly appreciated this. The only advice I didn’t feel comfortable with was to develop more character for Han Solo. I felt that would have detracted from Leia’s story.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

I like to start with “what if” questions to get a story going. The concept of The Mask of Leia is a good example. What if Leia has PTSD and is being internally pulled by the dark and light side of the Force? Think about that question and you have all sorts of ideas for a story.

Write with passion and don’t be afraid to go with your gut when writing a story. If you let others get involved and question your story concept early in the process it will most likely upset your creativity and your story will turn out half-assed. Of course, listen to feedback once you’ve completed that first and subsequent drafts as feedback will help refine and improve the story.

Finally, I’d say that make sure that you develop engaging characters.

Such characters are distinct, likeable (or loathsome) and have a strong motivation. Ultimately, these characters do not ride along with the flow of the story, rather they create the direction of the story.

***
Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: John Johnson

STAR WARS Episode I: THE REDEMPTION OF SKYWALKER by Brian O’Flaherty

Watch the May 2016 Fan Fiction Screenplay Winner.

STAR WARS Episode I: THE REDEMPTION OF SKYWALKER

Genre: Sci-Fi, Adventure, Action, Fantasy

Synopsis: Some stories are too important, some stories must be retold. The story of Anakin Skywalker will be molded between the pressure of separate forces vying for his soul, which will determine the fate of the galaxy.

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Sean Ballantyne
ANAKIN – Chris Ormrod
SHALI/MARA – Isabella Bontorin
OWEN/VARIOUS – Neil Kulin
ADMIRAL LEOPOLD/VARIOUS – Mark Sparks
OBI-WAN – Dan Cristofori

Get to know writer Brian O’Flaherty:

What is your screenplay about?

The screenplay is about the events that took place prior to Star Wars, A New Hope. It is the first part of a trilogy, that tells the story of these events.

How is this origin story different than the original episode 1? What makes it better/different?

There is no argument that can be made, to convince someone on the merit of the original prequel movies, and “better” is a subjective idea anyway. However, many Star Wars fans were disappointed with the original prequel movies, and I believe there are a multitude of reasons for this, but I will only touch on what I believe to be the main reason for this disappointment.

The main reason for this disappointment, relates to the question of “what” Star Wars is, and/or what it has become.

The original Star Wars was one of the most popular movies to ever come out. It redefined so much, relating with not only how to technically create a sci-fi movie, but in how to create the elements of the story, the characters, the pacing, the comedy, etc.

It was a perfect storm of creative vision (Lucas), comedic writing, pacing, editing, and of course musical masterpieces.

It was created as a team effort, like a well tuned sports car, and I believe, if any element was out of place, it would have turned into the flop that they initially feared it to be.

The original intention was to create a “space adventure film,” and although technically, one could define Star Wars in this context, it became something much greater than this simple idea.

The reason it became something much greater than a “space adventure film” is because of the idea of “the force.” The force turned Star Wars from just another “fun sci-fi movie” into something special. It quite literally, gave it “soul.” Star Wars became a narrative about the human condition, asking the ultimate philosophical questions about what it means to be human, and how our choices and thoughts effect us, not just in the physical world, but also in the “spiritual.”

No matter what one’s personal beliefs, this philosophical narrative is compelling, and it’s at the heart of Star Wars.

Without getting into detail, my screenplay attempts to bring back the “soul” of Star Wars, because I believe this is what made people fall in love with it, on a deep, emotional level.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Skywalker redemption.

One of the main plot point differences with this Star Wars script and the 7 produced films is that the story is not continuous. We jump from timeframes in Anakin’s development years. Some will argue that this isn’t Star Wars and the films need to a seamless adventure set in the same time. Why did you diverge from the original structure? And what makes this version still in the Star Wars universe vain?

Good question. First of all, you can’t (or shouldn’t) make a new Star Wars film by copying the last films. The original Star Wars cannot be recreated. It is not possible. Any attempt to do so, will not create something original, it will simply “ride the wave” of what people think “Star Wars” is, but any attempt at doing this is intrinsically flawed and will fall flat.

For example, although I liked the new movie, because it had many original elements, and was well crafted, fundamentally, it was a copy of the story from A New Hope. For example, the destruction of the “Death Star” fell flat and emotionless, because it was simply a copy from something we had already seen before, and the audience was not emotionally involved with it, for it was a fairly obvious retread.

Also, The Empire Strikes Back, was a very different movie from A New Hope. It added very strong elements of romance, elements of philosophy, and elements of “family.” This is one of the reasons people believe it to be the “best” Star Wars movie, because it laid the foundation for the “soul” of Star Wars, which I discussed previously.

People could have argued that The Empire Strikes Back was not “Star Wars,” for these reasons. However, it maintained similar comedic undertones, philosophical ideas, musical and pacing elements as the first movie.

To further that point, The Return of The Jedi, was again, a very different movie from the previous two. It was more dialogue heavy, had a slower pacing, and actually had a story structure that was broken up between the two unrelated story locations of Jabba’s palace and the Endor moon. Jabba’s palace did not lead to the Endor moon. People could argue that Return of The Jedi wasn’t “Star Wars.”

On the final point, about continuity. I feel that Stars Wars has so many crucial elements that are vastly more important than timeframe continuity in a single film. Although I would have preferred to have a relatively continuous timeframe, I feel it was more important to create a structure that follows the entirety of the character study of Anakin Skywalker.

I feel the character study of Anakin Skywalker is too complex, to devote an entire film to his time as a child. There is simply too much ground to cover.

On the flip side, Anakin’s story as a child is too important to leave out entirely. The size and scope of the trilogy requires a timeframe jump. This is likely to be the only timeframe jump in the trilogy.

To say it is not “Star Wars” because it contains a timeframe jump, seems silly to me, because the elements of Star Wars are there, and missing a single stylistic element, doesn’t seem to contradict anything about the originals.

In addition to this, The Empire Strikes Back has a slight timeframe jump as well. A jump that is not clearly explained, but is there. The time Luke spends training with Yoda is not explained, relating to how much time has passed. It is clear that a significant amount of time had passed (I believe the writer said “months”) and I doubt people would consider this lack of pure timeframe continuity to “not be Star Wars.”

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

For the version read at your festival, I spent about fourteen months. Although there was plenty of note taking before I even started writing.

How many stories have you written?

This is my first complete screenplay, although there are several versions. You have read the “abridged” version.

What motivated you to write this screenplay?

It has been a fire burning in my belly for years. I never intended to send it to a festival however. I found out about several “fan fiction” festivals after I had nearly finished writing it.

Ultimately, the reason I wrote it, was to somehow, someway, make it into a movie, because that is what screenplays are for, and that it how I wrote it. I didn’t write it to be an entertaining read. I wrote it to be an entertaining movie.

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

The biggest obstacle is feedback. You must get some feedback. I have a friend who was willing to read it, and provide feedback. I took some of his advice, but stuck to my heart where I disagreed with him.

The ability to receive feedback, and use it to your advantage, is a critical part of writing, I believe, because when you’re writing, you don’t know if what you are doing is making any sense or not. It’s easy to get into your own head and think something is working when it is not, or think something is not working, when it is.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Star Wars and Shakira.

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

The feedback was priceless. Again, feedback is crucial. You must hear what someone thinks about the script. The next thing that is crucial, is to stick with what you believe in, and make changes where you feel the criticism has found something worthwhile.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Thinking is the most important part. Have a notepad, where you can write down ideas when they come into your head. You will NOT remember them later. You must write down the thoughts that come into your head. I use my smart phone for this. I write notes down all the time, some of it is never used, but most of it is what makes the foundation for the screenplay.

Second, you need as much feedback as you can get. They don’t have to be professional readers, but they MUST find some sort of criticism with your work.

Worthless feedback is when you are told something is “good” or “bad.” Anything else is valuable and necessary.

Equally important to receiving feedback, is your ability to use it for YOUR BENEFIT. Use it like a tool. Don’t use it to satisfy somebody else’s idea of how things should be, unless you absolutely have to as a requirement.

***

Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: John Johnson